The AIMS Team Hunts Waya Woman, Finds Old Coffee Can

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Secret of the Blue House - Mountain Monsters 603

When the AIMS Team didn't find the Waya Woman last episode, they decided to return to Jackson County and continue the hunt for this 7-foot tall wolf creature. And there's still the mystery of the triangular stone carving in the old house that points (for reasons unknown) to locations of sacrificial alters in two directions -- and something else in the third.

They meet with the owner of the property where the triangle points, and find that he has some interesting tales to tell. He hasn't had any encounter -- no screams in the night like his neighbors have had -- but he does have an odd covenant written into his deed that declares he has to grow corn on the property, and not harvest it. He also says that somewhere in the field there's an old coffee can that his grandfather had always told him not to touch or mess with. He shows the team his deed and the accompanying map, and Jeff lays his drawing of the triangle over it. Without scale or direction (because who needs precision?) he determines the third point of that triangle definitely points to this property. So now the team dedicated to hunting monsters is focused on hunting an old rusted coffee can.

Not being seven foot tall and elusive, they don't need to build a trap for this. It's already in a trap of sorts anyway, when Buck finds an upturned five-gallon bucket, under which is the coffee can. He lifts it up, and the dirt is loose around it. Not caked, not baked, and full of cobwebs and nails. Note i don't say "rusty" nails. These are in pretty good shape for having sat out for at least a couple of decades. Buck dumps the nails and finds the can also holds an old bicycle bell, also shiny. They don't know what it means, or how it ties to the Waya Woman.

But we're going to find out.

Jeff gets a message that someone else in the local area has information about the Blue House, with some physical evidence they need to see. So they go meet up with Dave, who's timid about coming back to the property. Apparently Dave was on the property about two and a half weeks ago, just before the AIMS team first came. He was just wandering through the corn field, and recording it on his phone (conveniently enough) when he heard a tapping. When he came out of the corn field, he was at the blue house, and in the top window was a little boy tapping on the glass. Apparently a little boy in a window is "beyond evil" according to Dave's description of the night's events.

At least he took video, so now we've seen the little boy, too. I wonder if he knows the little girl.

There's another neighbor as well, and he has even more information on the house. His grandmother knew the family that died there, and spent years investigating it. When she was told that the family had been killed by wild dogs, it didn't sit right with her. So she got the autopsy reports, including a 10-year-old girl and a 9-year-old boy. The woman was supposed to be a 42-year-old female -- with blonde hair and blue eyes, according to the report. But the grandmother knew the mother had brown hair and brown eyes. This was a younger woman, between 20 and 24.

The grandmother also found a journal of the mother, which pretty much indicated she was as crazy as a bedbug. Nothing but "No lights. No lights. Turn off the lights!" scrawled on page after page. If the children were caught with a light, so the story goes, she would shut them in the closet until they said "Mother, mother, the lights are out" three times.

This has all the makings of a Bloody Mary story.

And there's one other thing the grandmother found: an old picture of a bicycle bell. The boy would be sent by the mother into the cornfield at night, in the dark, where he would sit and ring his bicycle bell, wanting his bike back. So the other story that came from this is that if you go into the center of the field alone, with no lights, and ring the bell (that nobody is supposed to touch or mess with), then something will happen.

Jeff thinks there's a direct connection between the crazy lady and the Waya Woman. Me, I think she found her husband with a younger woman, flew into a rage, and killed the whole family -- that she, in fact, is the Waya Woman. But I'm getting ahead of the script writers... uh... researchers.

So here's the plan: Huck wants to go into the closet with Jeff.

That came out wrong. Let's try again.

Huck and Jeff are going to take turns in the closet to see what happens.

Buck wants to go into the field alone and ring the bell.

Willy and Wild Bill will be around, listening for who screams first so they can run pell mell with guns in their hands.

Sounds like a party!

In the closet, Huckleberry sees a little girl and a little boy, and we hear their voices. In the field, Buck rings the lonely little bike bell and waits.

Huck comes out of the closet...

Okay, again, poor wording.

Jeff opens the door to the closet and finds Huck crying, emotionally shaken. Jeff wants to get a piece of that, and takes his turn, also seeing not only the kids, but also the mother who send him running screaming out of the closet, which brings in Willy and Wild Bill.

Meanwhile, as Buck talks, we hear the bike bell again. Only he's not doing it, and it's sitting on the ground at his feet (someone's going to have to refill that coffee can, again).He hears it over and over, and as he runs out of the corn, we get a quick, fleeting shot of a face straight out of Spirit Halloween.

Meeting back at the truck, they tell each other their stories, ready to leave this place forever. But we have one more piece of physical evidence -- something Huck found in the closet while he was sitting in there.

A photograph of a real monster.